Funding roundup

Steele’s Mechanical President Dan Bailey (center), a Central Piedmont Community College alumnus, visited the college to present a $50,000 check to Kevin McCarthy, vice president for institutional advancement (left), and Aimee Brunton, director of development. (Photo: CPCC)

North Carolina’s Central Piedmont Community College received a $50,000 gift from Steele’s Mechanical for scholarships for student veterans. Steele’s Mechanical President Dan Bailey, a Central Piedmont alumnus and U.S. veteran, visited the college’s Central Campus to present the check.

“As a U.S. veteran, I understand the financial difficulties student veterans face when trying to identify the funding needed to pay for college,” Bailey said. “When I was a student, I saw several of my fellow veterans leave school because they couldn’t afford it – even with GI Bill assistance.”

This inspired Bailey and the company to host a charity golf tournament in the fall to raise scholarship funding to ensure Central Piedmont’s student veterans could complete college without worrying about debt, Bailey said.

Another North Carolina college – Cape Fear Community College (CFCC) – will use a $3,000 donation from the organizers of the Southport Wooden Boat Show to fund an annual scholarship for students in CFCC’s wooden boat building program.

The scholarship is funded from the proceeds of the group’s annual boat show. The Southport Wooden Boat Show has supported CFCC students since the scholarship’s establishment in 2014. To date, the group has donated $15,000.

Arizona

Diné College will work to reduce domestic and dating violence, sexual assault and stalking on campus using a $299,912 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women. The tribal college will implement a victim-centered approach that blends western and traditional healing strategies. Diné College officers will participate in trauma training and a mandatory sexual assault, domestic violence and dating violence education program will be developed for incoming students.

“Our goal is to expand on our training program on self-defense and prevention efforts among our students and the community, and train our security personnel to obtain the skills needed when answering calls on domestic violence,” said Velveena Davis, executive director of institutional planning and reporting at Diné College.

California

Chabot and Las Positas colleges will use a $500,000 grant to address mental health needs of students. The grant comes from the state chancellor’s California Community Colleges’ Mental Health Services Program.

The grant “is critical to Chabot’s ability to further develop and expand much-needed mental health services, programs and training on campus such as counseling therapy, mental health first aid and various support groups to help students persist in their educational and career goals,” said Chabot’s Vice President of Student Services Matthew Kritscher.

Chabot’s counseling, advocacy, recovery and emotional support (CARES) team will coordinate the college’s $400,000 grant to maximize resources in a way that engages the entire campus in responsive interventions that support student equity and success.

Las Positas College will use its $100,000 grant to expand mental health services.

“The college is experiencing an increase in mental health referrals and this investment by the state will allow for the Student Health and Wellness Center to hire additional personnel, explore online services and outreach to vulnerable student populations,” said Vice President of Student Services William Garcia.

Florida

Tallahassee Community College’s (TCC’s) FIRST CLASS campaign got a boost with a $25,000 gift from Kim and Todd Engstrom. The donation, which is being matched, will support the renovation of a biology classroom.

“I love that we can provide a catalyst to inspire passion for biology at Tallahassee Community College through the renovation of a biology classroom,” Kim Engstrom said. “TCC is a special place and to be able to be a part of a student’s love of this science is a wonderful thing to support.”

The FIRST CLASS campaign started with a list of 50 classrooms to underwrite for renovation. Today, one classroom remains and is awaiting an underwriter.

Kim and Todd Engstrom present a check for $25,000 at the TCC District Board of Trustees. (Photo: TCC)

Indiana

Ivy Tech Community College’s new career coaching and employer connections initiative received a grant of nearly $1.1 million from the Richard M. Fairbanks Foundation.

The statewide initiative will emphasize comprehensive career readiness best practices alongside rigorous academics through the duration of the Ivy Tech student experience. Each student will develop a career action plan within the first semester of enrollment that is informed by labor market data and aligned with the student’s academic plan. Ivy Tech coaches will engage with students early and often, ensuring students complete career-aligned milestones every 15 credit hours, including resume development, interview preparation, employer engagement and work-and-learn experiences.

“Our approach to what some might refer to as career advising or career services is going to change and become part of the student experience from day one so that when our graduates leave to take that next step in their career they are ready to enter into a high-value, high-demand job,” said Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann.

The Fairbanks Foundation grant will support the implementation of the program at the Indianapolis campus.

Louisiana

Delgado Community College allied health division students will benefit from new imaging equipment in the radiography and surgical technology programs, donated by Ochsner Health System. The college is getting two surgical c-arm imaging devices.

“With our students having access to the surgical c-arm in a lab setting, they will gain a stronger knowledge and understanding of the c-arm operation, as well as acquiring the skills needed for success in a sterile environment during surgeries,” said Delgado Radiography Program Director Ty Delger.

Michigan

Grand Rapids Community College (GRCC) will expand early childhood play-and-learn groups aimed at boosting school readiness through $671,553 from Kent County’s Ready by Five Early Childhood millage.

GRCC is among 16 community groups awarded funding from $7.6 million generated by the millage. Selected programs provide prenatal support, parenting education, comprehensive health services or early learning opportunities, focusing on families with the greatest needs. The funding is coordinated by First Steps Kent.

“Serving the region’s youngest learners and their families is one of the ways GRCC is relevant and responsive to the people we serve,” said GRCC President Bill Pink.

The college’s Phyllis Fratzke Early Childhood Learning Laboratory operates play-and-learn groups to help parents and other caregivers learn skills and strategies to prepare children to succeed in school. Services are currently provided at 11 sites in Grand Rapids. GRCC anticipates adding four locations. The funds also will provide the opportunity to offer more year-round sessions to extend caregiver learning beyond the school year.

GRCC’s Phyllis Fratzke Early Childhood Learning Laboratory operates play-and-learn groups at 11 sites in Grand Rapids. Four more sites will be added with new funding. (Photo: GRCC)

Wisconsin

Gateway Technical College’s new Promise 2 Finish program is off to a good start with a $250,000 donation from HARIBO of America. The program will help students who left college to return and earn a degree by filling the gap between financial aid and tuition costs.

“At HARIBO, we believe everyone should have access to affordable, quality education and have the resources to make that happen – and that’s exactly what this program will do,” said Toni Hansen, HARIBO of America director of human resources.

To recognize the contribution, Gateway has changed the name of the auditorium in the conference center on its Kenosha Campus to HARIBO Hall.

About the Author

Tabitha Whissemore
is a contributor to Community College Daily and managing editor of AACC's Community College Journal.